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Featured activities in San Quintín

 

Search the San Quintín directory of activities to learn more about one of the highlights below.

Surfing
Beaches
Clamming
Boating and sportfishing
Camping and RVs
Kite boarding
Hiking in pine forests
Kayaking
Hunting
Bird watching
Diving and more

Surfing

True, the water is usually very cold, but Cabo San Quintín is an excellent right sand bottom point break.  To get there:   120 miles South of Ensenada. Off the Highway 1. South of the military facility and head west. Look for the yellow sign that says “Entrada y Salida De Vehs Militares” or the white sign “Zona Turisticas De Atractivos Naturales Bahia Falsa Parque Volcanico,” and stay on the dirt road for a couple of miles until you see the beach.

Beaches in San Quintín

There are plenty of great and usually very uncrowded beaches around this area.  Some have rolling white sand dunes that wave like chiffon in the frequent winds that caress the coast.  On the other hand, when those winds get frisky, better to move out of range of the ensuing sand-blast that can occur.  Some beaches to try are La Chorera directly west of town, northwest of Bahia Falsa; Malibu Beach, north of town; Playa Medano, on the Pacific, that runs from Picacho Vizcaino to Cabo San Quintin; Playa de Oro; Playa Pabellón, which is the nicest beach in the area, and Playa Tranquilo, which is a few miles north of the town of El Rosario to the south of San Quintin.

 

 

Clamming

This might be the only page in Baja.com that recommend the clamming activity for a Baja locale:  But it is a fun past-time here!  All three of the bays (Bahía Falso, Bahía Maria and San Quintin) that comprise the area have plenty of clams and mussels.  The vast beaches by the Hotel Santa Maria are one location (easy to get to) for digging up Pismo clams at low tide.  You can use your hands, but there are also bags and digging forks that are available in town.  Just remember, don’t overdo your clam-digging (the locals don’t like it) and don’t take clams that are smaller than your hand.

 

Boating and Sportfishing

The varied marine environment in this region, that is created by the intersection of the Pacific and the three bays, makes the San Quintin coast an excellent area for surf casting and inshore fishing.  There are all kinds of different game fish (yellowtail, sea bass, ling cod and others) in the waters, and tours can happen with panga boats and larger fishing vessels. Both San Quintín Sportfishing (616-165-6046) and Don Eddie’s Landing coordinate fishing and boating ventures, as does Yak Fish Vacation, and can help you plan a great sport-fishing and/or boating trip from you in this region.

Camping and RVs

There are plenty of places to park the old RV in and around San Quintín:  Posada Don Diego, Meson Don Pepe, Old Mill, Cielito Lindo, Enriques RV Park, and one of the nicest, Pabellón RV Park.  There is also camping at Laura’s Wet Buzzard Zopilote Mojado.

A great place to spend the night, north of San Quintin in a remote area near Erendira is called Coyota Cal’s, that calls itself ‘the hottest Mexico Hostel for the Old Baja Adventure.’  Surfers love it, and although there is tent-camping, there is also other lodging there.

Kite boarding

As we keep reminding you, Pacific Ocean waters can be cold…but that’s what wet-suits are for!  Why not don one and get out there to take advantage of the almost constant breezes in this area that help create a perfect environment for kite boarding.

Hiking in pine forests

Head north out of San Quintin, and look for the sign on the right hand side of the road, south corner, that will indicate the route turn-off for San Pedro de Martir — the actual place where this happens is called San Miguelito, but you probably won’t know that; as vague as this sounds, it is fairly easy to find the turn-off.  The road is paved, and will take you through some little hamlets, like Sinaloa, past the famous Meling Ranch, and up into the beautiful Sierra de San Pedro de Martir National Park.  You might have a chance to do some condor viewing (there is currently a multi-natonal condor protection program underway), and there are many lovely spots to stop for a picnic or just to smell the pine-scented air.  On Saturdays, between 11 a.m.-1 p.m., visits are accepted at the National Observatory, but reservations are necessary.  Call (646) 174-4580.

Kayaking

South of the bays, kayaking is at its best, with calm waters and easy launching.

Hunting

Hunting is popular year-round in the Valle de San Quintín, both in the tidal lands and marshes, as well as inland in some of the flatter valley areas.  During the winter, hunters come seeking ducks and geese, and throughout the year, quail hunters abound.  You can contact Campo Lorenzo (616-165-6022) to find out more about some of the hunting excursions.

 

 

Bird watching

With migratory birds passing through the area, and with the mild climate that typically prevails, bird watching is optimum in the San Quintín area which is famed for having some of the best birding available in its bays and marshes that are to the southern end of town.

Diving and more

San Martin Island, just five miles offshore from San Quintín, is a diving paradise with crystal clear water along the kelp beds growing on the volcanic island’s east shore. Between the island and shoreline the prevalent NW winds keep sails full for sailboats.