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Have a Baja Moment! Visit the Mission at San Ignacio

Have a Baja Moment! Visit the Mission at San Ignacio

The mission of San Ignacio de Kadakaamán was founded in 1728 by Padre Juan Bautista de Luyando as the 11th Spanish mission in California. San Ignacio was the northernmost mission for the next 23 years and today is the most northern Spanish mission in the modern Mexican state of Baja California Sur.

The site for San Ignacio was discovered in 1716 by Jesuit Padre Francisco Maria Piccolo on an expedition from the mission at Mulege. Piccolo had heard of a large settlement of Cochimí Indians and much fresh water at their home, called Kadakaamán. Once there, Piccolo found hundreds of natives awaiting conversion. Padre Piccolo named this place San Vicente for the next dozen years until a mission could be founded.

Visit the Mission at San Ignacio

Mission San Ignacio was founded in 1728 by the Jesuit missionary Juan Bautista Luyando. Image: Jack Swords

Many expeditions were launched out from San Ignacio in search of new mission sites. The most famous was led by Padre Fernando Consag in 1746 to the Colorado River delta. This expedition finally put an end to the idea that California was an island. Consag found a spring that would be developed for the next mission north. Consag called the site La Piedad and it was to become the mission of Dolores del Norte. However, when funds became available the benefactor requested the mission name be changed to Santa Gertrudis, in honor of his daughter.

San Ignacio’s date palms were originally planted by the Jesuits. Flash floods were responsible for great losses, so the Jesuits had a massive dike built. It was called a “muralla” and was three miles long, twelve feet high and up to forty feet wide and located just east of town.

Visit the Mission at San Ignacio

Mission San Ignacio is the northernmost mission in Baja California Sur.

The beautiful cut stone church construction was completed in 1786, by the Dominicans. The Dominican Order of Catholic Priests took over Baja California mission operations in 1772. San Ignacio proved to be a very successful mission and remained open until 1840. Today, the grand stone church is the center of the town of San Ignacio and faces the town plaza.

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula. We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurantshotelsvacation rentals and activities, as well as guides, maps, complete event calendars and great stories about incredible travel destinations, from Tijuana to Cabo San Lucas.  We also provide free personal travel consulting, planning and booking services in Los Cabos, Todos Santos and La Paz, with prices that match or are below best advertised price. For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

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Have a Baja Moment! Fishing in Mulege

 Have a Baja Moment! Fishing in Mulege

Situated on Baja’s sunny central coast alongside the Sea of Cortez, Mulege is considered by many to be one of the most picturesque locales on the entire peninsula. Located less than 40 miles south of the historic town of Santa Rosalia, this quaint poblado sits between two hills and is studded with immense groves of date palms that line the shores of a life giving fresh water stream that casually meanders down into the sea.

Fishing in Mulege

Situated on Baja’s sunny central coast alongside the Sea of Cortez, Mulege is a secluded hideaway where visitors can truly relax and unwind.

Originally discovered by the Jesuit father Juan María de Salvatierra on his return from a trip to Sonora on Mexico’s mainland, Mulege quickly began its transformation into a captivating oasis replete with hundreds of palm trees, fruit orchards, bougainvillea and other colorful foliage. Since the Jesuits were known to have brought large quantities of dates with them as easily preserved food, it is believed that they distributed the pits near the local water source in the hopes of eventually developing a sustainable resource for the future.  It is obvious that they were successful beyond their wildest dreams. They also brought along the seeds of fan palms, which allowed them to fashion thatched roofs for the local structures.

Over past centuries, the blessing of a freshwater stream has helped turn Mulege into a thriving oasis.

Today the town offers several good restaurants, R.V. parks, a bus station, a nearby airport, and a variety of accessible lodging options. There are also several outfitters that are readily available to help you plan fishing and diving trips, as well as excursions to visit the sites of ancient cave paintings.

Less than 10 miles northeast of this palm lined refuge, Punta Chivato is a popular destination for anglers. For many years, it was primarily visited by hardcore Bajaphiles and RV groups, but since the construction of improved launching facilities and other infrastructure developments it has become an extremely popular destination for private boaters who come to fish its still relatively abundant waters. 

The waters around this region have long been considered a prime destination for those seeking quality gamefish.

There was a time when this area was known as a ‘sure thing’ for those targeting large sea bass and grouper, but several decades of intense commercial fishing pressure have reduced populations of these species to all-time lows. Nevertheless, anglers who ply the deep holes and pinnacles around the small, inshore islands known as Islas Santa Ines can still look forward to a host of snappers, cabrilla, and leopard grouper that are interested in taking their bait or lure.

The offshore bite during summer can be absolutely sizzling in these waters. Yellowfin tuna, yellowtail, dorado, marlin, and even occasional sailfish are available several miles out. And, as with most pelagic species found in open water, almost all of these fish are best located by keeping a keen eye on your sonar while simultaneously looking for working flocks of circling or diving birds.

The pristine shores of Bahía Concepción may no longer be covered with a variety of shellfish, but they still offer some of the most picturesque beaches in Baja.

Just south of Mulege, Bahía Concepción is one of the most beautiful spots in Baja.  It is just over 20 miles long, and ranges between 2 and 5 miles in width. This incredible bay was once teeming with scallops, oysters, butter clams, and nice sized fish.  Sadly, these days the oysters and scallops are long gone, as are most of the larger gamefish. The relatively few clams and fish that are still available are generally only found along the eastern shore of the Bahia. Nonetheless, Bahia Concepción remains an idyllic destination for kayakers, beachcombers, and RV enthusiasts.

Those seeking the vibrant Baja nightlife so enthusiastically embraced in places like Ensenada and Cabo San Lucas will not find it here. Mulege is a gentle place where, as whales and porpoise cruise just outside a secluded cove, you can sit on the beach and immerse yourself in the true essence of‘old Baja’.

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula. We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurantshotelsvacation rentals and activities, as well as guides, maps, complete event calendars and great stories about incredible travel destinations, from Tijuana to Cabo San Lucas.  We also provide free personal travel consulting, planning and booking services in Los Cabos, Todos Santos and La Paz, with prices that match or are below best advertised price. For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

 

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Have a Baja Moment! Adventures in Mulege

Have a Baja Moment! Adventures in Mulege

If it hadn’t been for my sister pushing me to come with her to Mexico and then offering free lodging in an exclusive Cabo hotel, I never would have made it to Mulege. We planned this road trip so we could take in the real Baja California and almost didn’t make it to Los Cabos because we couldn’t leave Mulege – make that, wouldn’t leave Mulege. We kept trying for a week before finishing our trip to lands end. Now, here we are back in the magic that wouldn’t let us go.

Adventures in Mulege

Alisabeth always pushed me into experiences I would have never had on my own. She got me aboard this Mexican shrimping trawler that was about to leave from Mulege for a night of fishing. I looked at her and she just grinned at me as the massive engine roared into life, and the ratcheting sounds of the heavy anchor chain warned us that we would soon be underway for the night; two gringas accompanied by a boat load of rough-looking marineros. She and I stood with Captain Chamula at the helm of El Joven. We gazed out on the beauty of the Gulf of California. How we had been invited aboard was still a mystery, but Alisabeth was relentless in getting me to say yes, saying it would be an experience of a lifetime. In this moment we were both feeling like we were on a National Geographic assignment, and the adventure was just beginning.

The water was glassy, and El Joven sliced through its stillness. The nightly routine began. The nets were dropped just outside the protected coastline a short time after dusk. Shrimp stayed hidden during the day and fed at night. The heavy nets disappeared below the surface. One small net called a “chango” or monkey, was used to check the catch before bringing up the two larger nets. When the count in the chango was ten or more the big nets would be hauled in.

Piloting in ‘S’ shaped patterns across the gulf, the cook called us to the galley for a light supper of sautéed onions, tomatoes, peppers and tender diced shrimp, all wrapped in a warm flour tortilla. The marineros, were respectful, but we could tell there were many questions in their eyes. Well into the night everyone took their places; two men on each side of the ship with the nets, while two men handled the winches. Groans issued from the cables being pulled taut under the weight. My first look at the bulbous nets clearing the gunwale threw me into major conflict. This was reality; this was the way shrimp got to the stores. Wrapped in neat packages, consumers never saw this devastation. At the same time a writhing mass of other living things were hauled in and dumped on deck: bottom fish, starfish, small shark, snail, shells, crab, and eels. There were whispers of an illegal sea turtle.

Adventures in Mulege

This was a very old form of work, men needed to feed their families, and the world wanted shrimp. Alisabeth and I felt a deep dichotomy; horrified to witness the destruction of the sea bottom. The deck crew went to work after securing the ropes and cables. With primitive wooden tools, they began to sort through the sea bottom carnage, separating the shrimp, and throwing them into large wicker baskets. The men tossed the edible fish to the side; these would become breakfast or dinner. The rest of the squirming mass became food for the sea birds.

This ritual of gathering would be done three times during the night. Sleep for the crew happened between the net pulls. We tried our best to fit into this sleep pattern. Near dawn, I slipped into the narrow passageway to the galley, trying to gather my sea legs under me, but had to use my hands pressed against the walls. The seas had definitely picked up. Everyone was still sleeping before the last net pull. On the ancient stove hot water was waiting. Using the cloth filter sown to a wire ring, I scooped dark grounds into it, poured the steaming water through and filled two cups. Slopping the coffee, I made wobbly progress to the helm. Chamula leaned back on the Captain’s chair, arms crossed. His bare feet rested on the spokes of the wheel, his knee bounced in time with the Mexican polka. With a grin, he reached for the coffee. Then without warning, he jumped up from the helm, and gave me the wheel. Shocked I exclaimed, “What?! What am I supposed to do?” Stay on course, west, he said. I called after him, “Please, don’t forget to come back.” I clutched the wheel and headed toward land.

Adventures in Mulege

He was busy waking the men with a gentle nudge, and didn’t find the need to reassure me. Everyone pulled on their yellow slickers and headed out on deck rubbing sleep from their eyes. I could hear the growl of the winches as they strained to pull in the nets; secretly I was thrilled being at the helm. The sky began to fill with circling birds. Their numbers increased to nearly swarm proportions. They knew the feast was certain. Finally I joined Alisabeth at the rear of the boat, to watch in utter astonishment as the mound of undesirable sea life was pushed overboard. In one swirling body the birds began to dive. With wild screeching, feathered bodies smashed into each other as they fought to get the wiggling banquet.

As the sky and the gulf waters turned blazing pink, Chamula dropped anchor. The decks were washed down, as well as the baskets of shrimp. The men pulled up short wooden stools and the cleaning of the shrimp began by ripping the heads from the bodies. Twist. Toss. Twist. Toss. The shrimp were sorted by size, and the heads went into a pile which would be given to the local fisherman for bait. Dropping anchor, the first pangas shoved off from shore headed in our direction.

After a breakfast of mouth-watering fresh fish, beans with plenty of lard, and strong coffee, we managed to crawl over the ship’s gunwale, and down into the bobbing panga without falling into the water. Back on the beach, the marineros begged us to stay. We promised our return. As we walked to the car Alisabeth asked, “An experience of a lifetime?” I sighed, still feeling the swaying decks of the Joven under my feet. “Yes, you were right. An experience of a lifetime.”

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula. We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurantshotelsvacation rentals and activities, as well as guides, maps, complete event calendars and great stories about incredible travel destinations, from Tijuana to Cabo San Lucas.  We also provide free personal travel consulting, planning and booking services in Los Cabos, Todos Santos and La Paz, with prices that match or are below best advertised price. For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

 

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Have a Baja Moment! Discover Santa Rosalia and its Gaelic Roots.

Have a Baja Moment! Discover Santa Rosalia and its Gaelic Roots.

by Tom Gatch

By the time that a humble rancher named Jose Rosas began noticing oddly round, green mineral deposits showing up in his soil back in 1868, the future of Santa Rosalia on the Cortez coast of Baja Sur had already been forged. After the small pellets were later analyzed on the Mexico mainland and determined to be copper, it was not long before foreign interests moved in and formally began excavating in 1870. By 1884 over 42,000 tons of copper and more than 6,000 ounces of gold had been produced from the town.

Santa Rosalia harbor. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, by Gregg M. Erickson

By 1885, the architecture of Santa Rosalia then began taking on a distinctly Gaelic influence after a French company named El Boleo acquired rights to set up a large mining facility in exchange for building the town as well as an adjacent harbor and ferry system for transporting workers in from Guaymas, just across the Gulf of California on the Mexican mainland.

Touring the town today, visitors often get the sensation of being in another time and space. The small wooden houses festooned with porches and balconies, the Hotel Frances, the Municipal Palace and the popular Morelos Garden, where you can find one of the locomotives shipped over from Europe in 1886, all harken back to a less complicated era.

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While it may be true that Santa Rosalia lacks the long, beautiful beaches and upscale resorts that are so common in many of Baja’s other tourist destinations, it definitely offers a more sedate and relaxingly pleasant venue that is quite unlike any other region in the Republic Mexico. One of the most stunning examples is the French architecture of the quaint church designed by Monsieur Eiffel, whose world famous tower is situated on the Champ de Mars in Paris.

 

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Santa Rosalia and its church of Santa Barbara, designed by Gustav Eiffel.

 

Just south of Santa Rosalia lies the naturally protected San Lucas cove and nearby Isla San Marcos, just across Craig Channel. The inshore waters harbor pinto bass, cabrilla and leopard grouper, while the channel allows access to seasonally exceptional fishing for yellowtail, white sea bass, dorado, yellowfin and skipjack tuna as well as the ceviche friendly sierra.

 

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Fishing around the island can also be very productive, especially near deep pinnacles and holes where big grouper and snapper wait within rocky liars to ambush their prey and play havoc with the terminal tackle of the anglers who pursue them.

Although Santa Rosalia’s nightlife and social culture can quite subdued most of the year, the town still puts on a great Carnaval celebration in the middle of February, their annual Fiesta de Santa Rosalía in early September in honor of their patron saint and a festive Founder’s Day celebration that takes place in mid-October. And, while you should certainly be aware that the weather here can often be extremely hot between June and October, you should always bear in mind that the nearby waterfront malecón offers an excellent venue to catch a cooling afternoon breeze with a frosty margarita in hand.

La Damiana Inn offers a nice place to stay in Loreto, just 120 miles from Santa Rosalia.

Although there are some nice hotels in Santa Rosalia, like Hotel El Morro, visitors might also think about staying in nearby Loreto to the south, or San Ignacio to the west. And a word to the hungry–Santa Rosalia boasts famous pastries and one of Baja’s top rotisserie chicken restaurants (on the right side of the street after you turn into town). Buen Provecho!

Baja.com would love your photos of Santa Rosalia.  Be sure to have a good time and share it in pictures! Send photos to info@baja.com.

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurants, hotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.  For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

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Rock Art and Cave Paintings in Mulegé: Have a Baja Moment (in Time)!

by Ashley Curtin (all photos courtesy of VisitBajaSur)

You can Have a Baja Moment (in time) as you walk through caves discovering collections of prehistoric art (rupestres) drawn on the sides of boulders and along rocky walls located in and around Mulegé.

Have a Baja Moment (in time) when you discover the rock art in the Great Mural Region.

Geometric symbols, animals, human figures and life-sized murals adorn the narrow caves and rocky overhangs at La Trinidad, Piedras Pintas and San Borjitas—well-known rock art sights within the peninsula’s Great Mural Region. All of these are an easy day-trip from Mulegé.  The rock art famous to this area is primarily depicted in red and black coloring. The most common figures travelers will see during a hike through the caves are human figures and deer along with various other animals including rabbits, bighorn sheep, birds, snakes and fish. Made up of simple details, cave paintings offer travelers a unique perspective into the area and they reveal quite a bit about Baja’s indigenous history.

Cave paintings, like these at La Trinidad, often feature indigenous animals and peoples.

The closest rock art sight when visiting Mulegé is La Trinidad. Located just 20 minutes west of the town, this site is federally protected by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and part of the UNESCO World Heritage List. Not only do travelers need a special license to enter the caves, they must be part of a guided tour, which can be easily arranged in Mulegé with many companies offering various packages. The hike to La Trinidad starts with a four-mile canyon hike followed by a few river-crossings—depending on the time of year of the visit, swimming might be required. Narrow trails then lead travelers to the Great Murals of this area. The most famous of the rock art in La Trinidad is the deer painting in deep red color with various other animal representations around it. A fish skeleton and a few human figures with arrows shot in their neck can also be seen on the walls and ceilings of the cave. While there is more rock art above this initial spot of La Trinidad, it includes a strenuous hike and a swim to get there. The natural scenery during this hike is beautiful, but the rock art is sporadic and less impressive. Therefore, few travelers continue the trek up.

 

Have a Baja Moment? This indigenous fellow apparently had an unpleasant one!

Another popular rock art sight is Piedras Pintas, a natural prehistoric wonder just 30 minutes outside Mulegé. This area of the Great Mural region runs about two-football-fields in size and is made up of rock carvings and engravings. After climbing over boulders and hiking unmarked trails, travelers will approach the concentrated rock-carving area of Piedras Pintas. A group of boulders, which formed from a prehistoric earthquake, consists of hundreds of sea life images and just a few animal drawings. This is unique to Piedras Pintas and a spectacular sight for travelers to discover.

The last area for travelers to see rock art around Mulegé is San Borjitas. This part of the Great Mural Region is located more than an hour’s drive north west of town, but is very well known in the area. The rock art can be found in a remote canyon just a short hike in. With most of the figures drawn at life-size stature, San Borjitas consists of unique ceiling to floor cave paintings of human figures, most depicted with arrows injected in the body. This hike provides travelers an understanding of the warfare from Baja’s indigenous past.

Discovering the Great Mural Region and rock art found in the mountains of Mulegé is a beautiful adventure filled with history, art and natural beauty, and makes this Baja experience a great escape for anyone.

Discovering the Great Mural Region is a one-of-a-kind adventure in Baja!

Here are a few suggestions when planning a rock art adventure to the Great Mural Region:

-Find a package that works best with your schedule; day-trips or overnight trips are available in the area.

-Don’t try to find the caves yourself; the scenery looks the same and makes it easy to get lost!

-Pack lots of water.

-Wear Dri-Fit clothes so it is easier to dry off after wading through rivers.

-Pack belongings in waterproof bags (and it is never a bad idea to have handy individual-use packets of Neosporin).

-Always stay near your guide.

Mulegé is one of Baja’s most tropical, romantic locales.  Let us know what you love most about this tranquil paradise by emailing us at info@baja.com.

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about localrestaurants, hotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.  For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

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SCORE Baja 1000: The Fever Begins

By Terry Marcer

SCORE Baja 1000 Fever — It is upon us now!  The teams that are marking the course (Ensenada to La Paz, starting November 18, 2012) are working on that now.  We had the South marking crew stay a couple of days ago and we will have the North marking crew in a few days.  We love this time of year as the excitement is in the air.  I don’t think there is any time of year that the locals like better.

 

SCORE Baja 1000

 

We started here at Ignacio Springs B&B with three yurts in 2001 and had our first race come through that fall.  We thought it would be a bunch of partying guys having a good time but we did not realize what a serious business racing is.  We were also pleasantly surprised to see all the family groups, sometimes three generations all working together as a team.  They are very serious and those that stayed that first year have come back every second year (when it passes through San Ignacio to La Paz) since.  They are the best people!  We have usually had a team or two ‘pit’ on our property as well.  Last time we had two teams that pitted with us and won first in their respective classes.  I just had to post on our Facebook page that all the winners stay at Ignacio Springs!

 

Ignacio Springs B&B's thatched yurts and cabins are a magnet for SCORE Baja 1000 participants.

We now rent 11 yurts/rooms and have several multi-bed options and cots that can be added as needed.  We have made the best friends among our clientele base and there is a saying about Bad Roads bringing Good People and I don’t think there can be much worse roads than the Baja 1000 course.

This year we are very busy working on our latest project, Tootsie’s Bar and Grill which will be located just off the square.  We hope to be open by November 7th and will be open 6 days a week, closing only on Tuesdays.  Tootsies will offer a varied menu with a little bit of an international fare and cold drinks!  The site is the historic building that most recently housed the Farmacia Ceseña and this building was the site of all the social events in San Ignacio before the salon social was built.  There is a bar and sitting area inside as well as a patio dining area out back.  Hours will be 11 am to 10 pm or later as needed.  We hope to give the race teams and their support crews a new option for dining in San Ignacio.  It is easy to find, three lefts once you get to the square and you are there.  You can also park in the square and walk through the paseo almost directly to Tootsies!  Can’t wait to have you get to know our daughter Toni who dreamed up the idea of Tootsie’s and will be running it.  The Fever is upon us!  Good luck to all teams!

Terry and Gary Marcer own the San Ignacio Springs Bed & Breakfast, located right on a small lagoon in a thick thatch of beautiful date palms, and famous for its thematic yurt suites and rooms.  For more information, call them at (01) 52-615-154-0333.  Email them at mail@Ignaciosprings.com or visit Ignacio Springs on Facebook.  

Looking for a place to stay along the SCORE Baja 1000 route?  Visit Baja.com!

Baja 1000

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about localrestaurants, hotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.

 

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Mulege Storm Watch Message- Paul

Oliver: Storm Watch Message

Mulege Storm Watch Message- Paul
Weather Station of WB6EZI/XE2
Rick Barber – Owner
Oliver – Forecaster
Baja.com will be bringing periodic updates about Mulege and environs to readers from Rick Barber, Mulege resident and local expert.  Stay posted!

Latest Alert, October 15, 8 p.m.:  PAUL UP TO HURRICANE 3 STATUS:  MIAMI, Oct. 15 (UPI) — Hurricane Paul revved up to a Category 3 storm Monday afternoon with 120 mph winds as it roamed the Pacific off the Mexican coast, U.S. forecasters said.

Paul, which powered up from 90 mph just 3 hours earlier, was centered about 415 miles off Baja California’s west coast and was heading to the north-northeast at 13 mph, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said in its 5 p.m. EDT advisory.

Hurricane-force winds extended up to 25 miles from Paul’s eye and tropical storm-force gales reached out up to 90 miles.

The Mexican government issued a hurricane warning covering the Baja California coast from Santa Fe northward to Puerto San Andresito.

 

Earlier Today:  Hi All.

I slept in a bit this morning to relax after my strenuous week here at the farm.  Dad has the gripa so I got to feed the goats this morning.  They’re fine… thanks for asking.  We’re anticipating some little goats sometime around Christmas so that’s exciting.  William, our male goat, is running around with a big smile on his face!

OK.  enough of the news.  On to PAUL.

Looks like PAUL is going to be a baby hurricane, reaching that status on Monday morning well SW of the tip of the Baja and will be back to a Tropical Storm status by the following morning.  Just a”quickie”.  Anyway, as you can see by the track projection, PAUL is going to turn north and stay west of the Baja peninsula.  The track is about 200 miles west of Mulegé so that’s close enough to get some rain (maybe) but not a lot, if any, wind.  It is showing some signs of “banding”- which is throwing off bands of clouds (read “rain”) similar to the arms of a pinwheel that you played with as a kid.

Here’s a link to a moving picture of PAUL right now:  http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/goes/west/epac/flash-avn.html

Here’s the track:

And here’s a still of the latest position:

Isn’t modern technology wonderful?  200 years ago, I would have had to fly out there to get all this cool information for you guys!!!!

I just checked and I was right.  The current track is to the west of yesterday’s track so if that trend continues, PAUL will be even farther off the coast that today’s track predicts.  Well, we can hope.  Did you know that goat’s don’t like water?  Every time I break out the hose to fill their trough, they run to the other side of the corral.  They’re kinda stupid.  Maybe they think they are going to rust?  They are friendly though and love to be petted and scratched.

That’s it for today.  I’ll send another missive out after tomorrow’s radio net.  We’re starting it up again tomorrow morning and I give the weather reports.

Have a great day,

Oliver

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Mulege Storm Watch Message- Tropical Storm Miriam

When Oliver speaks, people listen...

Mulege Storm Watch Message- Tropical Storm Miriam
Weather Station of WB6EZI/XE2
Rick Barber – Owner
Oliver – Forecaster
Baja.com will be bringing periodic updates about Mulege and environs to readers from Rick Barber, Mulege resident and local expert.  Stay posted!

UPDATED 09/24/2012:  MIRIAM TAKES A TURN FOR THE WORSE!

Looks like MIRIAM decided to come to the Baja after all… and she’s now a Cat. 3 hurricane.  That’s the bad news… now for the good.  MIRIAM is going to peak in strength later today and then start to weaken fairly quickly and return to her Tropical Storm status sometime late Thursday or early Friday.  

By the time she hits the Baja on Saturday afternoon, she will be either a Tropical Depression or a remnant low.  Either still means rain and right now she’s heading right for somewhere between Guerrero Negro and Santa Rosalia.  Traditionally hurricanes track further to the right as time passes so I wouldn’t be surprised to see MIRIAM pass directly over Mulegé sometime on Sunday.  Now the question is how much rain is she going to dump?  It’s too early to tell folks but we’re gonna get wet and that’s fer sure.

Here’s the forecast track as of 8:00 AM this morning:

 

 

Mulege Storm Watch Message- Tropical Storm Miriam 09/23/2012

Hi All.

For some reason, I didn’t get the 8:00 AM NHC forecast so I just got it manually. We have a new Tropical Storm (MIRIAM) out in the Pacific that might get a little obnoxious. Right now, the various computer models are not in very good agreement. Some say the storm will travel out to the west and away from us but other models have it bending to the east toward the peninsula. Also, as far as strength goes, if the storm stays to the west, it will deteriorate more quickly BUT, if it keeps bending toward the Baja, it will be over warmer waters and won’t break up as quickly.

We’ll need another day or two of tracking to get a better idea of what’s going to happen. The 8:00 AM track has been “fudged” by the NHC to favor the track closer to the Baja. I think they’re just trying to put a little excitement in our lives.

Here’s the 5-day track plot:

Note that MIRIAM is forecast to become a Class 1 hurricane sometime today or tonight and then weaken to a Tropical Storm sometime Wednesday afternoon. Extrapolating the track beyond the 5-day forecast indicates that MIRIAM will be a Tropical Depression well before it hits the Baja peninsula if it decided to do that… and there is a very good possibility that it won’t. With some luck, we might get a little rain out of MIRIAM but the likelihood of us getting any significant winds is very remote.

I guess the bottom line right now is to not get excited. We have lots of time to let her figure out what she is going to do.

Have a great day,

Oliver

Mulege is a tropical paradise in Baja (but there is a reason it is so lush…did you say rain?).  Want to visit?  Check out Baja.com. 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurants, hotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.

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Storm Watch Message- Tropical Storm Kristy.

Mulegé, BCS, Mexico
Weather Station of WB6EZI/XE2
Rick Barber – Owner
Oliver – Forecaster

Oliver: Storm Watch Message

 

 

 

Hi All-
I don’t know how closely you are following the weather down here but I thought I’d better let you know about Tropical Storm Kristy. Kristy is not predicted to become a hurricane but, as we all know too well, Tropical Storms are fully capable of delivering a lot of rain and that is what causes our problems here in Mulegé.

 

 

Right now, the eye of Kristy is due south of Los Cabos with winds of about 50 mph. The “debris” clouds from Kristy are passing over Los Cabos right now and are dumping a lot of rain down there. The eye is forecast to move out into the Pacific but I expect the debris clouds to visit us at times and dump on us. Here’s the current satellite picture of Kristy:

Tropical Storm Kristy Baja

Storm Watch Message: Topical Storm Kristy Baja

The eye is the red dot directly south (below) Los Cabos. The debris clouds are just above and to the right of Kristy’s eye. As Kristy moves northwest out into the Pacific, these debris clouds will move north also and start to cover a lot of the Baja Sur peninsula (read US). Here’s the forecast track:

Tropical Storm Kristy Baja

As you can see, the National Hurricane Center is predicting a “hook” to the right after Sunday. Kristy will be a done deal by then but there will be a lot of grunge clouds out there that will pass over us after the storm dissipates.

So it’s looking like we’re going to be seeing some rain tomorrow and Friday and then a little clearing before we probably get some more rain early next week. I guess the bottom line is that, while we are going to get a goodly amount of rain that Baja can always use, I don’t think we’re going to get an amount that will cause substantial damage. We’ll see.

Have a great day,

Oliver

Mulege does get some rain…which is one reason it is a tropical paradise, with healthy palms and happy birds.  Want to visit?  

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about localrestaurants,hotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.  For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

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Rick Barber’s Eye on Mulege: Storm Watch Message

Weather Station of WB6EZI/XE2
Rick Barber – Owner
Oliver – Forecaster
Baja.com will be bringing periodic updates about Mulege and environs to readers from Rick Barber, Mulege resident and local expert.  Stay posted!

When Oliver speaks, people listen...

I guess what happened last night qualifies as an entrant to the Storm Watch archives. Just the other day, I was heralding the passing of two Mulegé milestones, September 2nd and Hurricane John. Both passed without incident!

We have been having some “unsettled” weather however. Storm clouds- nothing really organized- have been agitating us, off and on, for the past week or so. Last night, the rain gods got their act together around 7 p.m. and the proverbial poop hit the ventilator!

We got 1.89 inches of rain in under two hours. At one point, the rain rate (how fast it falls) was 5 inches per hour. That, folks, is a frog-strangler!!! The whole thing was over by 9:00 PM but the damage had been done. Downtown Mulegé looks like an Afghanistan war zone and removing the mud is going to keep the street sweepers busy for the foreseeable future.

I haven’t heard of any significant flooding (like water inside houses or businesses) but I’m sure there were some isolated instances. I did got a call from my wife around 8:30 to come and “rescue” her, my mother-in-law and two of their friends who had been attending an OUTDOOR mass at the mission. They had been getting reports of the river road flooding and didn’t think they could get out. I got old “Burro” (my ‘94 Bronco) out of the barn, slapped it in 4-wheel drive, and headed out on the rescue mission. Suffice it to say that the rumor mill is alive and well and, as usual, completely out of touch with reality. After fording several pools of standing water, the worse being about 2 inches deep, I arrived at the mission and completed my rescue mission without incident. I did pick up a few brownie points though so, those of you who know me well enough will appreciate the fact that I can use all the brownie points I can accumulate, deserved or not!!!

I’m sure the road under the bridge washed out- again. In actuality, it hadn’t been repaired from the rains we got last week. Welcome to the land of “mañana.” I’m sure most of you realize that “mañana” does NOT mean “tomorrow.” It means “not today.” Apparently, that is the case with the road repairs also.

Well, that’s about it for the update. The goats spent the night in their “apartments” and the chickens on their roosts inside the hen houses so they’re all nice and dry this morning and happy to have their food dishes emptied of water and refilled with nice, dry “breakfast”. As for me, I live on the porch so I’m protected from the rains. No wet peanuts or sunflower seeds for me thank you.

Have a great day,

Oliver

Mulege is a tropical paradise in Baja (but there is a reason it is so lush…did you say rain?).  Want to visit?  Check out Baja.com. 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurants, hotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.

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