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Researching Sharks in Baja and Beyond

By Serge Dedina

An interview with David “Dovi” Kacev, a Doctoral student in ecology at SDSU-UC-Davis who is carrying out research on sharks in San Diego and Baja California.

Our ocean ecosystems rely on these teeth to keep their delicate balances.

Dovi Kacev grew up in South Africa and San Diego. A longtime La Jolla surfer, Dovi is finishing up a joint SDSU-UC-Davis Ph.D. in Ecology. For the past 11 years he has carried out research on shark ecology and conservation which has allowed him to study sharks in the wild in San Diego, Baja California, and the Caribbean.

Patch: As a surfer who grew up in South Africa where there are a lot of sharks, why did you choose to make your life’s work the study of the ocean’s apex predators?

Kacev: From as early as I can remember I have been interested in sharks, but I did not think of becoming a shark biologist until I was in college. Learning about how important their roles are to maintaining balanced ecosystems, how little we know about their biology, and how much trouble they face due to human pressures, led me to realize that there is a lot that we need to understand better about sharks.  This led me to a career in shark biology.

Read the full story on the Imperial Beach Patch.

Serge Dedina is the Executive Director of WiLDCOAST, an international conservation team that conserves coastal marine ecosystems and wildlife. He is the author of Wild Sea and Saving the Gray Whale and took his first trip to Baja back in 1969. 

About Serge Dedina

Serge Dedina is the Executive Director of WILDCOAST/COSTASALVAJE and the author of Wild Sea and Saving the Gray Whale.

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