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About Lisa & Dan Goy Baja Amigos

Canadians Dan and Lisa Goy, who operate Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours, have been camping in Mexico since 1985.

Baja Campers Corner – Season 7 Kicks Off for Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tour

Baja Campers Corner – Season 7 Kicks Off for Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tour

Baja Campers Corner
Small group but big on adventure!

November 10, 2015 –Starting our 7th season and leading our 25th Baja tour how many new experiences could we have?  Well, Day 1 answered those questions. Our first stop is as always the Mexican Immigration Office to process the Tourist Cards. It’s usually a three step process: (1) complete the application, (2) pay at the bank, (3) return to the immigration officer to have the permit registered and stamped. Not today, this was 1 -top shopping at Mexican Immigration Office. Apparently the bank was low on funds, so the entire process was completed in the office and the officers were very friendly with lots of good humor.

Baja Campers Corner

Allan shows off his new hat.

Unfortunately the US Customs on return were not so friendly.  I knew we had some attitude with this particular officer immediately.  I responded to the standard question “Are you bringing anything back into the US” with nothing and the customs officer sternly stated “You are bringing back that Mexican Tourist Visa aren’t you?”  Ya, you got me there for sure.  Then our 2 Scots, Allan & Debbie were pulled out of line by the same Officer and sent to an interrogation room because of alleged Visa issues.   45 minutes later on closer examination and a proper scan of their Passports (something that was not done at the outset) and there was nothing out of order at all. Apparently the customs official was a good talker, but not a good listener. Homeland Security putting tax payers money to work.

Day 1 what could happen?  Well getting thru Tecate was not as simple as usual because of all of the construction, so we had some scouting to do in transit.  Once across the border we waited on the road, engine idling, 4 ways on, not wanting to lose #2 right off the bat. As #3 was about to clear the border they informed us they had just lent a $100 US to a needy injured Boater heading to Baja, short of funds and bleeding profusely (banged head at border entry station). Ok, we then made a right turn, and told them to stop at our location and wait for #4, we proceeded and found a spot to stop.  #4 cleared and we all started our move to pick up Hwy 3. Then we had another call from #3, while waiting for #4 they were approached by a Municipal Policemen who gratuitously extorted $20 US for Jim & Deb and now Allan & Debbie (who pulled in behind them) for parking in a no parking zone. Yes they were technically guilty, but really, they can see these tourists have been in Mexico less than 2 minutes and they can’t just push them along?  I have stopped many times in zones that say no parking, Mulege, Loreto, La Paz and San Jose, and the local Police have just told me to move.  No ticket, no fine, no threat to go to the Police Station.  Tecate Cops have such a unique “Welcome to Mexico”.

Baja Campers Corner.

Papas & Beer is always good.

The good news the rest of Day 1 went smoothly, the new Hwy 3 construction project was complete, eliminating a very windy narrow 10 km section of road.  We did have an impatient Albertan with a travel trailer so eager to head south he passed us and a semi on 3 different corners.  Hope he makes it in one piece.  We arrived at Costco and found parking, always busy on a Sunday.  We saw the same $100 Baja Boater (Colorado plates) heading south as we sat at the light at Costco turning south on Hwy 1. Guess he did not see us?

Did you know?After we got settled at the Villarino Campground, Adolfo and Belem are great hosts, then headed off to La Bufadora, also busy on a Sunday, most of the shops were open and the blow hole blowing well.  Definitely a fun event and experience for the gang. The next at the crack of 10:30 AM we set off for Ensenada, the Art Gallery, Former Casino, Fish Market and Historic Downtown.  No cruise ships in port and not a weekend so the gang had this pretty much all to themselves.  Fun was had, so was lunch and to top things off some refreshments and also saw some daredevil bicycle riding on Hwy 1 .  Tomorrow the adventure continues as we are off to Fidel’s and the beach once more.

Baja Campers Corner

This is art in Ensenada.

Situated adjacent to the peaceful southern shore of Ensenada’s Bahia de Todos Santos, the narrow, mostly barren finger of land known as Punta Banda assertively juts out into the Pacific Ocean, helping to form one of northern Baja’s most picturesque bays. At the very tip, the churning waters near the La Bufadora blowhole surge up through the rugged, guano covered outcroppings and, after reaching their apex, dissipate into a cool mist of salty rain.

But, because of its rural locale during times when most transportation was literally provided by horsepower, it only had a permanent population of fewer than 100 residents by the time World War I had ended. The land at the Punta Banda’s outermost point is haphazardly strewn with rocky grottos and coves that were created by volcanic upheavals eons ago; and the clear water that invades their shallows often turns a mesmerizing turquoise color under the bright Baja sun.In spite of a few scattered housing developments the peninsula remains predominantly covered by wild chaparral, cactus and sage. In 1885, Punta Banda was established as the southernmost sector of what was originally referred to as Colonia Carlos Pacheco, a region that was also comprised of San Carlos and Ensenada. It was distinguished by the presence of a natural hot spring that surfaced near the sandy shore, and a few years after that a hotel and spa was built as an attraction to bring in visitors.

Baja Campers Corner

La Bufadora was busy.

During the middle of the 19th century, it has been said that bands of pirates would hide in the secluded coves along the southern shores of the Punta Banda peninsula, and then sail out unexpectedly to take over freighters that were bringing gold and other valuables down the California coast toward their eventual ports of call on the east coast.

In a recent attempt to domesticate yet another portion of this wild land, Tiger Woods proposed the building of a massive golf course and residential complex that would sprawl over most of the primitive acreage north of La Bufadora cove.In the early 1930s, Charles Nordhoff, author of the book, Mutiny on the Bounty, owned a rancho near Punta Banda and hosted many Hollywood celebrities who enjoyed coming down to Baja for hunting and fishing, as well as the scenic beauty of the area. One of them was Clark Gable, who just a few years later won an Oscar for his performance as Fletcher Christian in the popular movie version of the story.

Baja Campers Corner

Looks like you could party here.

But whatever the reason, it is nice to know that a pastoral playground like this is less than a one hour drive south of Ensenada’s downtown business district.But, despite the fact that there were significant concerns and protests raised by environmental entities, it was declining economic conditions north of the border that ultimately spelled doom for the proposed luxury development. Today, Punta Banda draws increasing throngs of new visitors who enjoy basking in the sun, lying in the sand, catching a few fish or getting a gander at the world’s second largest blowhole.

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about localrestaurants,  hotels  and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.  For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

Baja Campers Corner: Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours Announces New Wagon Masters for Upcoming Season

Surrey, BC – Commencing immediately, Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours are pleased to announce the addition of new Wagon-Masters, Larry and Janet Lammon, for the 2015-2016 season.  Larry & Janet are avid fisherman and campers and have been visiting Baja since the 1960s with their families.  They have been members of Vagabundos del Mar Mexican Travel Club for over two decades, and have been leading RV Caravans for the club for the past three years.

Dan Goy, CEO said “We are thrilled to add Larry & Janet as Wagon-Masters.  Their passion for Baja, familiarity with this rugged terrain and keen desire to introduce other RVers to this magnificent peninsula makes them a perfect fit for Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours.”

Lisa Goy, VP added “Timing is everything and Larry & Janet have joined Baja Amigos as our tours continue to fill up earlier each season.  It’s hard to believe that three of our seven tours from November through early April this year are already filled.”

Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours

Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours have added two new wagon masters for the upcoming season.

“We first met Dan & Lisa a few years ago in Cabo San Lucas while we were both leading an RV Caravan tour group.  We were impressed by their personal approach, on-tour excursions and limiting the caravans to small groups is a great concept.  We are eager to introduce RVers to Baja, Mexico and look forward to our roles as Wagon-Masters for Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours,” stated Janet Lammon.

Larry Lammon said, “I retired at 60 in 2013 and relish our opportunity to spend more time in Baja.  I am confident our experience will serve us well as Baja Amigos Wagon-Masters for years to come and are confident those seeing Baja for the first time will be as amazed with the stunning beauty and wonderful people as we were.  Words really can’t express it; this must be experienced first-hand.”

Larry and Janet were both born and raised in California. They’ve  been married for more than 25 years, raising their family in Los Angeles.  Larry spent many years as a Beverly Hills policeman before embarking on a teaching career with the Los County Office of Education.  Janet spent almost 25 years with the United States Postal Service working as a Letter Carrier and Supervisor.  They now enjoy traveling and fishing with their German Shepard, Sampson.

Fact: Over 1 million Canadians and 30 million Americans currently own RVs, and the Baby Boomer generation is the fastest growing demographic in both countries.  Hundreds of thousands of Canadians and Americans snowbird to the southwestern U.S. within 250 miles of the Mexican border, from San Diego, California to Corpus Christi, Texas and the Gulf of Mexico shoreline each winter.

Vision Statement: Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours strive to exceed expectations from Day 1.  Baja Amigos flourish on past guest referrals and building strong relationships with industry stakeholders in Canada, the United States and Mexico.  Baja Amigos tours are recognized for service excellence, and for delivering a camping experience that is second to none.

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about localrestaurants,  hotels  and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.  For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

 

Baja Camper’s Corner: La Paz Here We Come

Baja Camper’s Corner: La Paz Here We Come

Baja Camper's Corner

We just call him “TEX” now!

December 1, 2014 – Well we arrived today in La Paz and have set up at Campestra Maranatha, a campground just north of La Paz in El Centenario. Our visit to Todos Santos earlier today is always a favorite, as many always look forward to the Hotel California experience.

They have a wonderful Cultural Center, Mission, Saints Alley and so many interesting shops. Lisa and I enjoyed our brunch, some headed over to George’s Taco Stand others at Cafelix. It was only a short drive today from Pescadero where we stayed at the Los Cerritos Surf Colony RV Park the night before. Although this is called an RV Park it is not much more than a parking lot with access to other amenities. Unfortunately the place sustained heavy damage from Hurricane Odile and was just commencing operation with the official opening tomorrow. The swim up bar and restaurant remained in renovation and should be ready in a couple of weeks. When we showed up they were just filling pool and only 2 tourists other than us were present. Teresa from Oregon office was supervising the opening and getting the operation up and going. We did manage to get in the pool and of course on the beach.

At 5 p.m. we headed for La Pasadita in Pescadero for our hosted dinner. Jose always does a great job and after for those interested we watched the Grey Cup game played in Vancouver at BC Place Stadium. It was an exciting game at the end and came down to a final play.

Baja Camper's Corner

Happy Hour is Happy!

As our time in Los Cabos was extended we had time to join our friends Rick & Ronnie for dinner at Lattitude 22, home of No Bad Days (well maybe one: Hurricane Odile). We also went for dinner with Peter & Geraldine who live at Cabo Bello. We had the usual excursions – Playa Santa Maria, San Jose Art District – and I met Frank Arnold and partner Carmen who have a Gallery in San Jose del Cabo. Many of the gang were out and about, Chris went diving and organized a boat ride to the Arch, Lover’s and Divorce beaches. Peter and I headed out into the mountains on Peter’s Razor (Side X Side). This adventure included the community of La Candelaria. You would not believe how much water there was in the arroyo.  Our Playa Medano Happy Hour was a great success. As always, we sure had fun.

Baja Camper's Corner

Looks like Dixie may be swimmin’.

Baja Camper's Corner

Sunrise in Los Cabos.

Tomorrow we have an excursion planned to La Paz. The tour continues, with more fun and adventure!

Baja Camper's Corner

Diego Rivera

Did you know?

Diego Rivera was born on December 8, 1886, in Guanajuato, Mexico. When his career began, the main focal point behind his works was to depict the lives of Mexico and its people. In 1921, working with the government, he began work on a series of murals that were located in public buildings. Some of his work was quite controversial; in fact, the Man at the Crossroads, which featured a portrait of Vladmir Lenin, which went up in NYC at the RCA building, was destroyed by the Rockefeller Family. He is today known as one of the greatest artists of the 20th century, and began working and drawing at the age of 10.

His passion for art emerged early on. He began drawing as a child. Around the age of 10, Rivera went to study art at the San Carlos Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. One of his early influences was artist José Posada who ran a print shop near Rivera’s school and furthered his education in Europe in 1907; while in Europe, he became friends with several famous artists, including Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, and Piet Mondrian.

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Parked for our visit to Todos Santos.

Famous Muralist

Diego Rivera had some success as a Cubist painter in Europe, but the course of world events would strongly change the style and subject of his work. Inspired by the political ideals of the Mexican Revolution (1914-15) and the Russian Revolution (1917), Rivera wanted to make art that reflected the lives of the working class and native peoples of Mexico. He developed an interest in making murals during a trip to Italy, finding inspiration in the Renaissance frescoes there. Returning to Mexico, Rivera began to express his artistic ideas about Mexico. He received funding from the government to create a series of murals about the country’s people and its history on the walls of public buildings. In 1922, Rivera completed the first of the murals at the Escuela Nacional Preparatoria in Mexico City.

Baja Camper's Corner

Great selection at Afrain’s.

Due to the controversial nature of this, as well as the other works which Diego Rivera created during this illustrious career, he became known as one of the leading artists in the 20th century. Not only in the US, where much of his work was debated, and even destroyed, but around the world. Since he took a worldly view on art, and depicted controversial scenes which depicted different forms of politics, which were not established around the world, many of his art pieces were quite unique, and were distinct in nature from the work which other muralists had done. And the fact that he shared an interest in certain political views, which were not widely accepted around the world, contributed to the distinct style in the murals he created during the course of his career.

Baja Camper's Corner

That was fun, thank you Jose!

Commercial Success

In the 1930s and 40s, Diego Rivera painted several murals in the United States. As mentioned earlier some of his works created controversy, especially the one he did for the Rockefeller family in the RCA building in New York City. The mural, known as “Man at the Crossroads,” featured a portrait of Russian Communist leader Vladimir Lenin. The artist had reportedly included Lenin in his piece to portray the turbulent political atmosphere at the time, which was largely defined by conflicting capitalist and socialist ideologies and escalating fears surrounding the Communist Party. The Rockefellers disliked Rivera’s insertion of Lenin and thus asked Rivera to remove the portrait. The painter refused, and the Rockefellers then had Rivera stop work on the mural.

Baja Camper's Corner

David in the Cerritos Surf.

In 1934, Nelson Rockefeller famously ordered the demolition of “Man at the Crossroads.” Publish backlash against the Rockefellers ensued; after long proclaiming a deep dedication to the arts, the powerful family now looked both hypocritical and tyrannical. John D. Rockefeller Jr. later attempted to explain the destruction of the mural, stating, “The picture was obscene and, in the judgment of Rockefeller Center, an offense to good taste. It was for this reason primarily that Rockefeller Center decided to destroy it.”

Baja Camper's Corner

La Calendaria

Later Life and Work

In the late 1930s, Rivera went through a slow period in terms of work. He had no major mural commissions around this time so he devoted himself to painting other works. While they always had a stormy relationship, Rivera and Frida Kahlo decided to divorce in 1939. But the pair reunited the following year and remarried. The couple hosted Communist exile Leon Trotsky at their home during this period. Rivera returned to murals with one made for the 1940 Golden Gate International Exposition held in San Francisco. In Mexico City, he spent from 1945 to 1951 working on a series of murals known as “From the Pre-Hispanic Civilization to the Conquest.” His last mural was called “Popular History of Mexico.”

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Great spot, eh?

Personal Life and Death

Diego had a twin brother named Carlos, who died two years after they were born. His mother was a Converso, whose ancestors were forced to convert from Judaism to Catholicism. Speaking about himself, Rivera wrote in 1935: “My Jewishness is the dominant element in my life.” Rivera began drawing at the age of three, a year after his twin brother’s death. He had been caught drawing on the walls. His parents, rather than punishing him, installed chalkboards and canvas on the walls.

As an adult, he married Angelina Beloff in 1911, and she gave birth to a son, Diego (1916–1918). Maria Vorobieff-Stebelska gave birth to a daughter named Marika in 1918 or 1919 when Rivera was married to Angelina (according to House on the Bridge: Ten Turbulent Years with Diego Rivera, and Angelina’s memoirs called Memorias). He married his second wife, Guadalupe Marín, in June 1922, with whom he had two daughters: Ruth and Guadalupe. He was still married when he met art student Frida Kahlo. Rivera and Kahlo shared an interest in radical politics and Marxism. They married on August 21, 1929 when he was 42 and she was 22.

Diego Rivera lost his wife, Frida Kahlo, in 1954. The following year, He married Emma Hurtado, his art dealer. By this time, Rivera’s health was in decline and traveled abroad for cancer treatment, but doctors were unable to cure him. Diego Rivera died of heart failure on November 24, 1957, in Mexico City, Mexico.

Diego Rivera is remembered as an important figure in 20th century art. His childhood home is now a museum in Mexico. His life and relationship with Frida Kahlo has been remained a subject of great fascination and speculation. On the big screen, actor Ruben Blades portrayed Rivera in the 1999 movie Cradle Will Rock. Alfred Molina later brought Rivera to life, co-starring with Salma Hayek in the 2002 acclaimed biographical film Frida.

Baja Camper's Corner

Darlene was the first at the bar in the 2014/2015 season!

Whether or not you agree with his political stands, or the relationships he engaged in during his lifetime, the creative manner and approach and the disregard for what people thought about his art distinguishes Diego Rivera as one of the most famous and most renowned artists of his time. Rivera’s philosophy of art and life correspond to no specific dogma. But instead he had an extraordinarily well developed intuitive sense that shaped his understanding of the world and his humanistic understanding of the role of the artist and the role of art in society. His ability to masterfully present universal images and ideas in his art continues to captivate viewers today.

Baja Camper's Corner

This Happy Hour is always fun!

Some of Rivera’s most famous murals are featured at the National School of Agriculture at Chapingo near Texcoco (1925–27), in the Cortés Palace in Cuernavaca (1929–30), and the National Palace in Mexico City (1929–30, 1935).

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Watch for these.

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurantshotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.  For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

Baja Campers’ Corner: Fueling Up Your RV in Mexico

Baja Campers’ Corner: Fueling Up Your RV in Mexico

Pemex aka Petróleos Mexicanos is the Mexican state-owned oil and gas company. We had something similar in Canada called Petro-Canada, that was created in 1975 and merged with Suncor Energy in 2009. This Mexican company was created in 1938, when all private foreign and domestic petroleum companies were nationalized into a single entity. A major labor dispute in 1938 inspired President Lázaro Cárdenas to side with oil workers, who were striking against foreign-owned oil companies for an increase in pay and social services.

On March 18, 1938, citing the 27th article of the 1917 constitution, President Cárdenas embarked on the state-expropriation of all resources and facilities, nationalizing the United States and Anglo–Dutch operating companies and creating Pemex. In retaliation, many foreign governments closed their markets to Mexican oil. In spite of the boycott, Pemex developed into one of the world’s largest oil companies. helping Mexico become the planet’s fifth-largest oil exporter. As of 2009, Pemex had a total asset worth of $415.75 billion, and was the world’s second largest non-publicly listed company by total market value.

Fueling Up in Mexico

Fueling up your RV in Baja has never been easier.

Our experiences with Pemex have changed dramatically since our first encounter in 1985, particularly in Baja. Back then stations were few and far between, the fuel storage tanks were above ground, and we had to add a fuel supplement to the regular grade fuel we put into our 1977 Ford Camper Van so it would run without pinging. We were warned from the outset of our first trip into Mexico to watch out for attendants who cheated you when pumping gas. We only actually experienced this once, on the mainland between Puerto Vallarta and Acapulco.

Thirty years ago we found the stations old, often not very clean (particularly the washrooms), and without many other amenities. Cash was the only option when paying, either in pesos or U.S. dollars, and we cannot recall if we were able to pay with travelers checks (it seems unlikely). And it was not uncommon to come to a station that had run out of fuel. Fortunately our old E250 had two tanks and we always carried a full gas can.

Today, Baja has no lack of Pemex stations. They’re franchised now, and often you will see them within two or three blocks of each other. For decades Bahia de Los Angeles was a town you always needed to arrive at full, as it was a long way – El Rosario to the north, Guerrero Negro to the south – from a PEMEX station. These days, LA Bay has a pair of Pemex stations, owned and operated by two different families in town.

Many of the Pemex stations in Baja are new and very clean, particularly the washrooms, and sometimes they even have toilet paper! Many of the newer stations also have OXXO stores, the largest and most profitable convenience store chain in Latin America. Many Pemex stations now take credit cards as well as cash, and the receipts can come in handy if you’re claiming a rebate from your domestic insurance carrier.

Fueling up in Mexico

A Pemex station in Loreto.

The challenge for an RVer is to find a station that has lots of room for entry and exit, particularly those with bigger rigs. The good news is many of the newer stations have lots of room, usually enough to arrive with a caravan of six or seven RVs, fuel up, and then park. Generally, you’ll find the diesel and gas pumps separated, often on each side of the Pemex station. It is important to remember that regular gas pumps are green, premium gas pumps are red, and diesel pumps are black.

It is common knowledge that Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) is the type of diesel fuel which has very low sulfur content. ULSD is more environmentally friendly than Low Sulfur Diesel fuel (LSD). Since 2006, ULSD has been widely available across North America and Europe. This occurred because the countries from North America and Europe adopted new emission standards which involved extensive use of ULSD. Many countries around the world took similar measures, while others lagged behind, such as Mexico.

Since 2007, all diesel vehicles manufactured in the U.S. and Canada have been designed for ULSD. There has been a lot of debate over the impact of LSD on newer diesels that run on ULSD. Many experts and owners agree that LSD does not affect the performance or operation of the vehicle. The real issue lies in the fact that a person might lose their warranty for some components in case they use LSD on a ULSD vehicle. For GM vehicles, the warranty on the exhaust system may be voided.

We know ULSD in Mexico can be routinely purchased in the northern border area, as well as in Mexico City, Guadalajara, and Baja. Unfortunately, the efforts of the Mexican government to make ULSD universally available across Mexico have met with limited success so far. Until 2010, owners of vehicles which run on ULSD could only purchase the fuel in northern Baja.  Pemex gas stations located in Baja Sur sold only LSD fuel brought over from the mainland. The good news is that since 2010, ULSD has been available throughout Baja. Pemex doesn’t sell the gas to the end user, independent franchise stations do, and with the rise in Pemex prices (diesel has been historically subsidized) and the increase of ULSD vehicles in Baja, all the fuel now flows from depots in Mexicali, Ensenada and Rosarito.

The proof, as they say, is in the pudding. The last couple of seasons we have had many USLD RVs on tour, including late model 2012 American Revolution (Cummings), Mercedes and Ford F-350, all without incident. Pemex fuel prices remain very competitive; 95 cents CDN a liter or $3.47 U.S. per gallon for regular gas. I recently paid $3.72 a gallon in Blaine, Washington for gas, and the pumps locally here in Metro-Vancouver, BC are advertising $1.41 a liter to fill up our Ford E 350.

We look forward to being back in Baja!

 

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula. We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurantshotelsvacation rentals and activities, as well as guides, maps, complete event calendars and great stories about incredible travel destinations, from Tijuana to Cabo San Lucas.  We also provide free personal travel consulting, planning and booking services in Los Cabos, Todos Santos and La Paz, with prices that match or are below best advertised price. For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

 

 

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Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours Announces New Wagon-Masters and Additional 28 Day Tours for 2014

Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours Announces New Wagon-Masters and Additional 28 Day Tours for 2014

Surrey, BC – Commencing immediately Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours are pleased to announce the addition of new Wagon-Masters, Dom & Diane Fraser, for the 2014 Baja season.

Dom & Diane have been avid campers for 3 decades and in 2006 full-timed in their RV for 3 years traveling across Canada, United States, Mexico, Central America and South America, 16 countries in all.  With a daughter in Calgary, Alberta, a son in Bucerias, Jalisco, and grandchildren in both Canada and Mexico, they certainly feel at home in both countries.

Dan Goy, CEO said “We are thrilled to add Dom & Diane as Wagon-Masters.  Their passion for Mexico, experience rving across Latin America and keen desire to introduce other RVers to this magnificent peninsula makes them a perfect fit for Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours.”

Baja Amigos

Dom and Diane Fraser will be joining Baja Amigos as Wagon-Masters for the 2014 season.

Lisa Goy, VP added “Timing is everything and Dom & Diane have joined Baja Amigos as our tours continue to fill up earlier each season.  Offering six (6) 28 day tours January thru early April 2014 makes sense, three (3) of these are already full and we are still in June.”

“We have watched Dan & Lisa grow Baja Amigos from an idea to a vibrant and successful enterprise.  We have always believed their personal approach, on-tour excursions and limiting the caravans to small groups was a great concept from the beginning.  We are eager to introduce RVers to Baja, Mexico and look forward to our roles as Wagon-Masters for Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours,” stated Diane Fraser.

Baja Amigos

Dom and Diane have been camping for over three decades, and bring a wealth of traveling experience to Baja Amigos.

Dom Fraser said, “I retired at 50 in 2004 and our dream of RVing across the America’s has been fulfilled.  I know this experience will serve us well as Baja Amigos Wagon-Masters for years to come and are confident those seeing Baja for the first time will be as amazed with the stunning beauty and wonderful people as we were.  Words really can’t express it; this must be experienced first hand.”

Dom was born in Britain, Diane in Canada and they have been married for almost 40 years raising their family in Calgary.  Dom spent many years as a hydro lineman while Diane worked in health care and education, mainly in Alberta before being bitten by the travel bug in 2004.

Fact: Over 1 million Canadians and 30 million Americans currently own RVs and the Baby Boomer generation is the fastest growing demographic in both countries.  Hundreds of thousands of Canadians and Americans snowbird to the southwest US within 250 miles of the Mexican border from San Diego, CA to Corpus Christi, Texas and the Gulf of Mexico shoreline each winter.

Baja Amigos

Dom and Diane relax with friends on a Baja beach.

Vision Statement: Baja Amigos RV Caravan Tours strive to exceed expectations from Day 0.  Baja Amigos flourish on past guest referrals and building strong relationships with industry stakeholders in Canada, United States and Mexico.  Baja Amigos tours are recognized for service excellence and delivering a camping experience 2nd to none by guests and industry partners alike.

Baja.com is a comprehensive online source of first-hand travel information for the Baja California Peninsula, supported by a full-service tour operator staffed by Baja locals (our “Baja Travel Savants”). We offer Baja travelers expert advice about local restaurantshotels and vacation rentals, as well as guides, maps and articles about events, sports and activities. We provide bilingual customer support, information and sales seven days a week, 365 days a year.  For more information, please call toll-free (US/CAN) 855-BAJA-411 or email us at info@baja.com.

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